Exhibitions

The Edge Effect: International Juried ExhibitionJune 30 - September 22, 2019

The Edge Effect describes an ecological phenomenon in the border area between disparate habitats, such as a meadow and a forest, which results in exponentially greater biodiversity. The Katonah Museum of Art recognizes that a museum creates a similar environment where works from artists with diverse backgrounds and locations are brought together to foster dialogue and spark creativity. Just as a border area is teeming with life, an exhibition can be a fertile place of ideas and images.

This exhibition includes works in all media and subject matter submitted by artists from all over the U.S. and 13 countries around the world. 67 works were chosen out of 957 submissions. Juried by Akili Tommasino, Associate Curator, Modern and Contemporary Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Awards granted to the top three submissions.

Click here for a full list of the artists.

Image Credits: Homepage image: Vera Kirilenko, 7, 2018, mixed media, 24 x 36 x 2 inches, Courtesy of the artist.
Above: Gerri Spilka, Edge #1, 2011, cotton quilt, 54 x 58 inches.

 

 Illustrated Animals in Conversation In the Learning CenterJune 30 – September 22, 2019Original picture book art is on display in the Learning Center this summer, highlighting animal characters in conversation with each other and inspiring conversations with the viewer. A variety of styles are on view from books written and illustrated by Nick Bruel, Eric Carle, Carson Ellis, Jerry Pinkney, Giselle Potter, Marisabina Russo, and Mo Willems. Creative illustration and animal-inspired activities throughout the room will excite visitors of all ages.

 

Opening Reception: Sunday, June 30, 12:00-2:00 PM

 

Eric Carle, Illustration for Where Are You Going? To See My Friend! By Kazuo Iwamura (Orchard Books). Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle, Courtesy of The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art. © 2001 Eric Carle.

 

Mark di Suvero’s Monumental SculptureOngoing

Since fall 2016 the KMA is host to two of internationally renowned artist Mark di Suvero’s pioneering steel sculptures. Since the 1950s, di Suvero has transformed industrial materials such as wood timbers, tires, and scrap metal to create works that dynamize their setting. Visitors will find the space of the KMA’s South Lawn activated with Yoga (1991) and the Marilyn M. Simpson Sculpture Garden with Rust Angel (1995), works that exemplify di Suvero’s ability to imbue familiar sites with an original energy.

 
This project is supported by the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation in honor of Charles Bergman's many years of counsel and service. Additional Support for this exhibition is provided by Jon & Nancy Bauer, Victoria & Stephen Morris, the Donna & Marvin Schwartz Foundation, the Silverweed Foundation, and the Ohnell Family Foundation. Special thanks to Elizabeth & Samuel Sachs for their support and collaboration.

Header Image: Mark di Suvero, Yoga, 1991, Steel, stainless steel, 29’ 6 1/2” x 31’ 2” x 31’ 2”. Courtesy of the artist and Paula Cooper Gallery, New York. Photograph © Margaret Fox Photography.
Image Above: Mark di Suvero, Rust Angel, 1995. Painted steel. Courtesy of the artist and Paula Cooper Gallery. Photograph © Margaret Fox Photography.

 

Lawrence McGarvey: Open MindOngoing

Beginning November 2017, guests will encounter a new sculpture perched steps away from the KMA entrance. Both figurative and abstract, literal and metaphor, Open Mind embodies the spirit in which the KMA hopes its guests will approach their museum experience.

Created by New York artist, Lawrence McGarvey (b. 1965), the sculpture comes to us on temporary loan from Paraphé Art, a new online contemporary art gallery launched by Susan Grissom, formerly of The Lionheart Gallery in Pound Ridge. The figure, a profile of a human head with a cloud-like hole cut-out in the place of its brain, allows the viewer to see the changing world through a cleverly-placed negative shape. The viewer’s mind penetrates the sculpture and opens up to the freedom of the space that flows through it. The sculpture is simultaneously emptied and filled and visually dependent upon the world that surrounds it. McGarvey explains that the sculpture is a monument to “freedom of thought“ as well as a lyrical homage to Rodin’s The Thinker.

Lawrence McGarvey, Open Mind, 2017.
Aluminum sculpture. Courtesy of the
artist and Paraphe.art.